Overview

The Rundown

Materials
Definitions of the Foundational Values
Electronic Copy of the Bracket (1 per group)
Optional: Supplemental Reflection Worksheet

Reinforced Values







All Foundational Values are important – No single value is more important than the others. However, if you were forced to choose, which Foundational Value would you rank as the most important? In Foundational Values Face-Off, the values are pitted against each other in a bracket-style showdown with students narrowing down the Foundational Values until one is declared the “winner”. This activity will help you recognize your students’ understanding of the Foundational Values and which Foundational Values may need to be further developed (both in theory and in practice) in your students.

Intro

All Foundational Values are important – No one value is necessarily more important than the rest. However, if you had to choose, which Foundational Value would you rank as most important? Today, the Foundational Values are pitted against each other in a bracket-style showdown. As a class, we will debate and narrow down the eight Foundational Values to a single “winner”.

Preparation

  • Determine how you will share the activity with your students. 
  • Determine if you would like them to complete the activity in groups or individually (with the option of using their families).
  • Decide how you would like students to respond to any of the debrief questions after they complete the activity and how they would do so.   
    • Protip:Consistently discussing their observations will heighten students’awareness of the conceptsplaying out in real-life in the market. 
  • Post the activity to your classroom platform for students to access and complete or set up a Zoom session to walk through the activity with students. 
  • Set up the bracket – Randomly assign the Foundational Values to a 1st round bracket spot.
  • Make sure students have digital access to the bracket such as by posting it in your virtual classroom platform.

Directions

(NOTE: These directions are written for a collaborative session with students virtually – if not collaborating as a class virtually, you can post pieces of the directions online with the resources listed above.)

  • ROUND 1: Tell students they will have 10 minutes in their groups to decide which of the Foundational Values in each matchup will move onto Round 2. After the 10 minutes is up, bring the whole group back together and give teams the opportunity to present their team’s argument for each of the FVs they selected to move onto Round 2.
  • Start ROUND 1 (allow 10 minutes). Arrange students in their groups and ensure they have access to their personal bracket for download/editing. If using Zoom, this would be a great opportunity to take advantage of their breakout room feature.
  • Round 1 debates (allow 10 minutes).
    • Protip: Craft this into a more formal debate environment where students have adequate time to prepare their facts, offer rebuttals, etc. This may require that this be expanded over additional class periods.
  • Vote for each matchup winner – majority wins.
    • Protip: Some video conferencing platforms have a polling tool – Consider leveraging that tool to speed up voting.
    • Groups will need to update their brackets to reflect which values received the largest vote totals.
  • ROUND 2: Tell students they will have 10 minutes in their groups to decide which of the Foundational Values in each matchup will move onto the Final Round. After the 10 minutes is up, bring everyone back together and allow them the opportunity to present their team’s argument for each of the FVs they selected to move onto the Final Round.
  • Start ROUND 2 (allow 10 minutes). Send groups to their breakout rooms.
  • Round 2 debates (allow 5 minutes).
  • Vote for each matchup winner – majority wins.
    • Groups will need to update their brackets to reflect which values received the largest vote totals.
  • FINAL ROUND: Tell students they will have 5 minutes in their groups to decide which Foundational Value is their vote for the “winner”. After the 5 minutes is up, bring the students back together and they now can present their team’s argument for their final selection.

Class votes for a winner – majority wins.

Debrief

NOTE: The purpose of this activity is to engage your students in a discussion about the Foundational Values, what they mean to each student, how they are applied in various situations, etc. It is important to emphasize throughout this discussion that no single Foundational Value is more important than the others; they build upon each other and are all necessary for an individual to practice in their own life. Through this activity, your students should see even more clearly how each Foundational Value is essential.

Students can complete the debrief on paper individually by answering the following questions or be put into groups via Zoom to discuss their learnings.

  • Do you agree with your class’s final selection? Why or why not?
  • Which one would you say should win and why?
  • Is any Foundational Value more important than the others? Why or why not?
  • What did you find challenging about this activity?
  • Did you change your opinion after hearing other arguments?
  • Do you think you would have come to the same final result if the Foundational Values had been placed in a different order in Round 1? Why or why not?
  • How did you personally use the Foundational Values during this activity?

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